Tuesday, April 21, 2009

63: Curiously Hungry

You can't call Joe Manavalan just a chef or a confectioner or a baker or a restaurateur. This is because his passion for food goes beyond the call of duty. And it's obvious that he has made the science of preparing desserts a culinary art because there are no compromises on his food presentation.
According to Manavalan, this is an art he learnt from the master chefs during at Oberoi. The Europeans are unsurpassed when it comes to making and serving desserts. I attribute all that I learnt to them.

Though X Y has a family-kind of atmosphere, Manavalan says that the business itself is run professionally. I learnt systems and processes from my German chefs, creativity from my French chefs and traditional secrets from the Austrian and British chefs. Then he surprises you with titbits of food history: "Do you know how the pastry Black Forest was created? In Germany, on wintry days in the Black Forest, you can see thick cherry trees with a dark brown bark and fully covered with snow on top. Little red cherries peep from behind the snow. As the dessert looks exactly like the cherry trees in the wintry snow, it is called Black Forest."


Manavalan also believes in mixing business and philanthropy. For, on display at the parlour are works of art by lesser-known artists, which guests can pick up. "We charge no commission from the artist."
Which eatery are discussing here...?


Answer: PAINTED PLATERS.

Eldrich, Miraj , Omar, Gaurav , AeToS and Vinay RM have cracked the answer.

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